I remember the crowd called

Our black player names.

How they rushed the court

When we won the games.

I remember the bomb in Birmingham

When the girls’ killers went free.

Then the march over Selma’s bridge

And the violence on TV.

I remember the Civil Rights Act

A master stroke by LBJ

The many tears of joy I shed

It was the dawning of a new day.

I remember how Vietnam exploded

How it took center stage.

The war dominated the news so much

That racism disappeared from the page.

But underneath all our triumphs

And the feeling of euphoria.

We would soon awaken to see

That it was too soon to sing Gloria.

For hatred never really disappears

But like an ember waits to flame.

It lurks in the hearts and minds of some

And couples with the chance of fame.

Racism’s there inside our hearts

Most of us not wanting to see.

It lies in wait for the spark

Whose flare will set it free.

Why is it that the things we do

So common for the majority,

Become a dangerous deathly threat

For those we call a minority?

A white boy seen in a hoodie

Is just a kid at play.

Why is a black boy dressed the same

Seen in such a different way.

We cannot only fault the men

Who shot the Georgia runner.

The fact that we are all to blame

Should not come as a stunner.

We need to look within our hearts

And purge our misconceptions.

We need to learn the simple truth

God loves us with no exceptions.

I thought that I had seen that day

But the journey was just beginning

I hope that those who follow me

Will see its triumphal ending.

– Cecil Rhodes,

Salida

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